Dick Wybrow’s Amazing Journey from Radio and TV Star to Becoming an Amazon Best Selling Author

Episode 216

We crack open the secret vault of hilarity with Canada’s own Dick Wybrow, who has turned the supernatural fiction genre on its head with his gut-busting humor. Picture this: a Canadian humorist penning bestsellers from a garage in New Zealand – and you’ve got the man of the hour! Dick regales us with his unlikely tale from a solitary childhood to a life brimming with laughter, best-selling books, and a love affair with radio that has listeners in stitches. His mantra of embracing the unconventional illuminates his journey through stand-up comedy, radio escapades, and crafting tales that have readers howling with delight.

Have you ever wondered what a wolf would do if it turned into a human? Dick’s series protagonist, Cain, certainly has his paws full trying to navigate this conundrum. We trace the pawprints of Cain’s adventure, from the bite that changed his life to his quest for humanity, all amid the uproar of an expanding book series and audiobooks voiced by Hollywood’s finest. Dick’s writing ritual is as quirky as his stories – early hours, a makeshift office, and a passion that doesn’t know the meaning of ‘quit.’ His success echoes a truth for all entrepreneurs and creatives: love what you do, and do it with discipline.

But hold onto your funny bones, because Dick doesn’t just write – he sells. He peels back the curtain on writing content that captures attention like a moth to a flame, sharing tales of radio campaign triumphs and the allure of humor in marketing. The potency of promise and payoff in storytelling, along with savvy strategies for harnessing the clout of Amazon and Facebook, are distilled into wisdom nuggets for aspiring writers and entrepreneurs alike. We wrap up with a salute to Dick’s entrepreneurial spirit, a testament to the fact that a relentless drive and a chuckle can propel you to the top of the supernatural comedy food chain.

How can the guests contact?  website, email, social?

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00;00;24;01 – 00;00;55;13
Unknown
Welcome, everyone to the Firing the Man Podcast. On today’s episode, we have the privilege to interview Dick. Why Bro Dick is an Amazon bestselling author of humorous supernatural fiction. Dick is a Canadian, and his novels are mainly set in the United States, where he grew up. A former standup comedian. Why Brown is a humor writer who crafts thrillers that incorporate elements of suspense or mystery, science fiction and fantasy is stuff that’s been heard on the radio by millions and seen on TV in 213 countries.

00;00;55;14 – 00;01;17;27
Unknown
In his spare time, Dick likes to write autobiographies in the third person. Dick loves to talk about creativity, humor, writing, werewolves and love of a great book and narcolepsy. Welcome to the show. Good and welcome from New Zealand, where it’s summer and it’s 22 degrees, which probably makes very little sense to folks in the U.S. because I was there too, obviously.

00;01;17;27 – 00;01;33;18
Unknown
So we’re going to start out this with a trick and make you sound really smart. So when you hear Celsius a fear and I don’t use it for cooking, but to give you kind of an idea about what 22 means in Fahrenheit, because I still think of Eric, I still think of an Imperial. Here we go. Ready? Double the number at 30.

00;01;33;18 – 00;02;02;29
Unknown
That’s basically the simple, simple rules. Not perfect, but it gives you an idea of conditions. So if it’s 22 right now, double that, 44 at 30, 74. So right now it’s about 74 degrees here in New Zealand, sunny New Zealand. And I give them I like what I if nothing else we talks about. Awesome. So to start off the episode and share with our listeners a little bit about your background and your path to becoming a best selling author, that was basically and you read some of the there it was, it was my path to avoid proper work.

00;02;03;02 – 00;02;23;07
Unknown
You know, I’d always been somebody who wrote because when I my father was a New Zealander, he ended up going to the U.S. and late sixties because I guess back then they just saw that could, you know, get off the plane smoking. Right. And come up there, knock on the door. Are people that you’re in the abs and had a quarter system now like all were filled up on New Zealanders go to Canada they’ll take anybody.

00;02;23;07 – 00;02;47;28
Unknown
So he ended up going up to Canada, met my mother, but always wanted to be in the U.S. And so when I was nine years old, we moved down to the U.S. and so here I was, a chubby red haired boy with a Canadian accent in the New Jersey school system. So I had zero friend. And so that’s where some of the writing started, I think, because I just started creating creating friends on paper and creating worlds that I felt more comfortable with.

00;02;47;28 – 00;03;01;28
Unknown
And actually there was an amazing moment that happened in that New Jersey school system that actually kicked me over to humor that I always had been a bit of a fan of. You then, you know, moved all the way through the Midwest and everything with my father at the time, I always thought that, cool, we’re moving to a new place.

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00;03;01;28 – 00;03;21;13
Unknown
It’s very exciting. And I found out only later as an adult it was because my father kept getting fired. It’s just the nature of the industry that he was it. And I was like, Well, we’re moving to a new place. Boy, our parents were really tense, but because of the move. And so we spend most of our time manually landing in and Edina, Minnesota, just outside of Minneapolis.

00;03;21;13 – 00;03;42;07
Unknown
And then from there, like I said, I was doing a lot of the writing stuff and it was the sort of thing where this is back pre-Internet, back in the old days. And so you would send out your short stories to these various places and you would put in there at Sassy. So address stamp envelopes so that when you put there and put the stamp on there, putting the envelopes in your story, send it out that way.

00;03;42;07 – 00;04;01;18
Unknown
When the rejection came back, you were paying for it myself. That but but it would take months and months and months. And so in my head, this moment made sense. So it took so long to get something published. Why don’t I write something and then go on stage? Because this made sense to me. Because then that meant that that night I was published.

00;04;01;18 – 00;04;21;24
Unknown
And so it wasn’t a great desire to get up and do stand up comedy. It was just so that I could write something. It was stories, not short stories like I was sending out to these various places, but it was stories because I was a big fan of storytelling comedy. And so I would write these little stories. You get one stage and each night I was getting published and that turned into a standup writing initially started writing career.

00;04;21;25 – 00;04;44;01
Unknown
Not right away, obviously, because when I first started doing it, I was that awful. I remember 5 minutes, man. If it’s like there is a bending of time and space when you’re on on stage and no one’s laughing, that 5 minutes is a long lead time. Well, I was 22 seconds of that. I got a laugh, I got some chuckles out of people.

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00;04;44;01 – 00;05;04;12
Unknown
And so I in this kind of became a bit of sort of a seed of what I do today. It just take the thing that’s working, get rid of everything else that isn’t, and that is actually really served me over the years of creativity in other places as well. So I had 22 seconds, I had 22 seconds, and I built that up into a minute, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, and I eventually had myself 45 minutes.

00;05;04;12 – 00;05;25;01
Unknown
I could do I could do a headlining gig. And then I eventually got into radio transferring that because the market in standup changed a bit where people were fewer and fewer people were coming out of the clubs because standup was all over. Television was shown popping up everywhere on and USA Today on 88, everything. So I got into radio, did that for about a dozen years, transfer it off and got into television.

00;05;25;01 – 00;05;37;17
Unknown
And of course, you know, you go from radio, I want to do TV. Let me do one of the biggest networks on the planet. I happened to be in Atlanta at the time because I had just done a rock show in Atlanta as like, let me go to I work for CNN. Of course, you’re not going to hire me.

00;05;37;17 – 00;05;51;21
Unknown
I don’t have any TV experience. The irony, that was why would they do that? I think sometimes when you come into a scenario, you realize, I can do this. I know even though you don’t feel that way, you could put on airs. Of course I can do it. Not arrogant, just confident. And they were like, Well, obviously you know it.

00;05;51;21 – 00;06;15;16
Unknown
You take a look. You know, he knows what he’s doing. Right. And I did that with CNN for about ten years. Then 11 years ago, we moved to New Zealand and I did seven years here doing 7:00 PM comedy news live program. So the comedy stuff really came and hand came in handy. And then in December, our show got canceled, even though the ratings were very high and record ratings, it didn’t matter because television as a paradigm has changed.

00;06;15;16 – 00;06;33;28
Unknown
Ratings don’t matter like they used to. And so as of December 1st, this past year, I am now full time writing. Excellent. So what a crazy journey so far and well traveled all around the U.S., New Zealand and Canada stand up comedy, which I think takes a lot of guts to get up and do stand up comedy. It sounds like it.

00;06;33;28 – 00;06;52;01
Unknown
It honed your writing ability. It got your stage fright, speaking, published. It honed a lot of your skills. Go into radio, going to TV. I mean, pretty incredible. And so now you’re landed, you’ve landed in writing. And so for anybody on our YouTube channel, you can see in the background there are the book covers. We’re getting ready to talk about our hanging up on our decks wall.

00;06;52;01 – 00;07;09;04
Unknown
And so let’s talk about the most recent book series, Wolf, where series, I believe there’s four of them. And maybe can you give like a 32nd brief on each one and kind of share what what the listeners like? And trust me when I say this, I’m not a big monster of a guy. I never set out to write a monster book.

00;07;09;04 – 00;07;26;27
Unknown
The basic things about this, Wolf, who gets bitten by this infected man out the woods? The next day he wakes up Human Rush, a six foot seven French-Canadian, by the way, because I thought that was funny. But when the moon comes out, when the full moon comes out, he turns into a werewolf. But depending on the moon phase, he’ll turn into a dog.

00;07;26;27 – 00;07;43;17
Unknown
And then so the story basically arc is basically about Cain trying to find out the secret behind what transformed him. Trying to find that secret, find this guy who beat him so he can transform back into a human brother, back into a wolf, because he wants to be able to run through the woods and be naked once again like he used to.

00;07;43;17 – 00;07;59;05
Unknown
I mean, he could do that as a human, but he’d probably get incarcerated. And he’s up in Canada. A very good chance, probably frostbite, very unfortunate for us. So this whole story is about Cain trying to find this with help from this woman named Imelda. The whole story is about them trying to find out how to transform him back into a wolf.

00;07;59;05 – 00;08;16;13
Unknown
I like it. And so so the whole story is broken down into four books. Number one is a bestseller on Amazon right now. Number two was recently released. Number three is either released or will release soon. That three has been released. It just came out at the end of December. Three is out just a few weeks now and four is coming soon.

00;08;16;14 – 00;08;31;29
Unknown
Four is coming out in in April and a third the way done with that. The fifth one was coming out shortly after that because I get I’ve got readers saying like, I don’t want to wait for all months. It’s like that fast, you know, take a look at me. I Game of Thrones, he’s taken years to finish that series.

00;08;31;29 – 00;08;47;22
Unknown
It’s been years since he published your book I’m doing. I did three books in one year, but they want it, so I’m getting it out. What’s fun, too, is the audiobooks come out of here, Perfect comes out on January 16th. So that’s really exciting for me because I wrote the picture because I was still doing the television gig 10 hours a week.

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00;08;47;22 – 00;09;04;25
Unknown
So I was getting up at 430 in the morning and writing this series in my little and one quarter, because this looks nice and fancy by me, because my wife made all this because she has design talent, but I’m in a garage, I’m in a two car garage, there’s carpeting on the floor because that’s kind of what they do in New Zealand.

00;09;04;28 – 00;09;21;08
Unknown
Housing shortage, I guess. So they turn this into a room. So my domain is one quarter of a carpeted garage. The rest of this adds all hers. She this, it all, all this little I. In fact, I got a gate that’s around me that’s to prevent the dog from getting in. But I feel like I’m a bit of a cage.

00;09;21;08 – 00;09;39;03
Unknown
I created all that here and it’s exciting for me as I like I say, I did this in Auckland, New Zealand, four or 5:00 in the morning and now I’ve got these two Hollywood actors that are putting their voice and their talent into this for the audiobook. I can’t wait to hear it. I can’t wait. It’s going to be really thrilling and probably emotional to hear these characters come to life.

00;09;39;05 – 00;10;11;21
Unknown
So the audiobooks are released and you had them, They’re narrated by. So yeah, the audiobook first one’s coming on January 16th, the next one comes out in February the third and will come out shortly after that. We’re negotiating the fourth and the fifth books right now. So yeah, that should all be coming forward. So can we dig into your creative process and what when you’re sitting down to write a book, is there anything that you’re doing beforehand or do you have any rituals or routines that helps you get into that focus where you can go in and do some some good writing, I think, and keeping this in this thought of, you know, we’re all

00;10;11;21 – 00;10;29;05
Unknown
entrepreneurs here, right? I really feel and I assume you might agree, is if you don’t have the passion for that thing, if you don’t have the drive that you feel like you have to do that thing, you ain’t going to make it. Or at least I would make it because like I said, I’ve got to sleep disorder. Yet I was getting my butt out of bed at 330 in the morning to do this.

00;10;29;05 – 00;10;44;11
Unknown
If I didn’t have the drive to keep doing that and keep plugging away, if I was sort of like writing a prescription, like I’d written other stuff in the past, I wrote two thirds of a trilogy that I felt would make it in the market. I sort of read the market. Let’s see if this works. Unfortunately, it did kind of well.

00;10;44;11 – 00;11;01;16
Unknown
It got optioned by this group called Circle Confusion, who later and I’m doing The Walking Dead, so I had some real interest in that. Fortunately, I say, because Bat told me I must be on the right track, but in writing that there was it was sort of like this fire investigators, a thriller series with pretty humor in there, but not remotely like I’m doing now.

00;11;01;16 – 00;11;20;22
Unknown
But that was more of a trudge to go do that because I wasn’t really enjoying it. I wasn’t didn’t feel like that was really coming for me. And so my process is thankfully, I have to write these books in this style. I really love this genre that I’m writing it. And so that gives me that sort of that push to get up and do this at 4:00 in the morning.

00;11;20;22 – 00;11;44;22
Unknown
And then the process just comes down to making sure I do something every day. Stephen King says that he writes six pages a day. I were talking before. You know, George R.R. Martin, he might do six lines a year. I don’t really know. I don’t know what his process might be. But I really feel as though if you’ve got your own small business and you are working for the man the way that you can keep feeling okay about that, because a lot of this is about what’s in our head.

00;11;44;22 – 00;12;00;22
Unknown
A lot of this is about our mindset. For my part, I feel I’ve got to do something every day because when I don’t write one day, the next day I feel awful. I get depressed. So sometimes I might sit down and there’s days because I’m tired or am busy or just can’t put it together. There’s some days where I feel like I just can’t.

00;12;00;22 – 00;12;17;16
Unknown
I just do it anyhow. It might be just one sentence, but even one sentence. I get that that sort of emotional buzz because I’ve moved the needle a little bit, just doing something a little bit each day. So when I wake up, the next day is like I’m further along today than it was the day before. And that helps.

00;12;17;16 – 00;12;30;29
Unknown
That helps me out a bit. And but sometimes I sit down to write that one sentence. When I’m struggling, it turns into a paragraph. Sometimes a paragraph turns into a page, and sometimes it turns into tempo. So I think my process is setting down on the days it has flow and let’s keep going on the dates is really hard.

00;12;30;29 – 00;12;45;27
Unknown
I just do it anyhow because I know it’s good for me and I really like that. And I think there’s a ton of questions that people, you know, whether they’re writing or running their own business or really anything in life. I think there’s a lot of lessons that they can take out of that response. And so you mentioned a sleep disorder.

00;12;45;27 – 00;13;08;13
Unknown
Can we can we get into that? What is it? How does that impact writing? I might call it a sleep disorder, I suppose, but I guess the medical community calls it a waking disorder, which is troublesome. What are those words even mean? But basically narcolepsy means that I’m sleepy all the time. One I heard somebody once describe narcolepsy as stay up for 30 hours now, going to work now come, I’ll make dinner and I’ll sit down and check your spouse.

00;13;08;15 – 00;13;27;22
Unknown
So I don’t know what your perspective is. I only know my own. I just know that I’m always very tired and but I do see it as something that that actually works in my favor. Not initially, because when I first got diagnosed, it was funny. I wasn’t even going in the get diagnosed. My ex-wife at the time remarried my ex-wife.

00;13;27;24 – 00;13;50;23
Unknown
She went in and she was convinced that she had narcolepsy and she sat down with the doctor to tell him her story. And I was there leaning in in the doorway. And I was just, you know, as we do, I was just piping in and offering fill in the blanks where necessary. And I swear to you guys, he sat across, he said, like, I don’t think you have narcolepsy, but I think he might add something about the way I was presenting or the way I spoke or whatever it was.

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00;13;50;23 – 00;14;04;23
Unknown
And then so the following week I went in and they put me in that bed and they had the monitors, the recording equipment, put all the suckers on my face. I slept through the night while they woke me up every hour to quiz me on a couple of things and go back to sleep, but only made the narcolepsy worse.

00;14;04;24 – 00;14;22;24
Unknown
And me let me sleep at all. But I did that. And then. Yeah, I’ve discovered that I you know, they diagnosed me with narcolepsy and it was actually that was in itself a positive because I now had a bit of a name for the demon. I’ve heard other people say that now that I sort of know what that sort of demon is, this narcolepsy, which drained of my energy.

00;14;22;24 – 00;14;37;08
Unknown
And for the first started, it, I was like, you know, woe is me. This is something that, you know, I’ve got this thing and why? Why do I have this? Other people don’t. But then I started to look at it the other direction because I saw some of the writing I was doing was sort of different than many other people.

00;14;37;08 – 00;14;57;12
Unknown
It was it was kind of gonzo. Some of the stuff I write about and I realize and to this day really believe this, that my narcolepsy is a superpower when it comes to my writing and how I sort of frame that is like, you know, when you’re lying down going to sleep, you’re lying down in bed and you’re just just about to drift out to sleep and you get some amazing idea or some great solution for something.

00;14;57;12 – 00;15;14;17
Unknown
I think I get to write that down as it’s really, really good. And you wake up the next morning, you don’t remember it and you didn’t write it out. That sort of dream state, that creative state, I’m there 80, 85% of the day. And so whereas I saw that as a negative and even right now, you know, I’ve got to push through this and be able to focus.

00;15;14;17 – 00;15;37;16
Unknown
I do find that I think a lot of the creativity I have comes because I’m in that crazy little dream state most of the day. What message would you give to other people dealing with narcolepsy or maybe a learning disability or anything? I love how you you’ve named it and you’ve called it a superpower. What lessons, whether it be narcolepsy or something else, or what message would you send to people dealing with something like this?

00;15;37;16 – 00;15;56;11
Unknown
There are plenty of other people that have more difficult conditions, and I have absolutely I know plenty of people that have ADHD or even dyslexia, and they’re writers and they have tools they can use. I just think that as best as you can, there’s so many things that go especially is like an independent businessperson. You’re sort of is you and maybe maybe your family just against the world.

00;15;56;11 – 00;16;11;23
Unknown
If you’ve got support from people, that’s great. There’s so many things that sort of chip away at your resolve and so for me, it was this sort of thing that I couldn’t have. This is well within me also taking away from me. So I needed to get a bridle on it and ride this thing somehow. And so maybe I’m fooling myself, I don’t know.

00;16;11;23 – 00;16;29;06
Unknown
But I do feel empowered by doing this way. So if you do have something, I don’t want to put it this this way because I don’t want to judge anybody, but I never want to use my narcolepsy as an excuse not to do what I love or what I want to do. So I think if you’re feeling that this becomes your use not to do it, try and turn it around.

00;16;29;06 – 00;16;45;08
Unknown
Don’t like don’t give yourself excuses because there’s plenty people out there not to be negative, just Barney people either that are just overjoyed. If you fail, your boss would love to see you not succeed because he loves you working for. So you just kind of push against that. You keep pushing against that. And if you can find some way to take what you have, who knows?

00;16;45;08 – 00;17;03;22
Unknown
You know, when it comes to like in my case with the narcolepsy, if I can use this to create stories and my stories are a bit nuts, I admit when I’m creating them, they’re pretty off the rails in the editing. They kind of they kind of get more honed into something that in the shape of a story. But if you can use it in some way instead of being something that detracts from you, I think it really helps your head.

00;17;03;26 – 00;17;19;11
Unknown
Yeah. Now that’s powerful and I really like that mindset of of kind of using that as a superpower. I want to pivot into your writing. So you’re actually a writer. You’ve been you’ve been writing for a while. Dave and irony commerce, love listeners or an e-commerce. And so we write a lot of copy for sales. We’re in physical products business.

00;17;19;13 – 00;17;35;15
Unknown
We kind of explain what our products are, how it’s going to help the shoppers, why they need our products. As you’re writing and your writing process, how do you like craft your journey and kind of grab the reader and take them through that to evoke emotion or something that you kind of carry them through? How do you do that?

00;17;35;15 – 00;17;52;25
Unknown
I think when it comes to the writing, that’s a bit different than maybe a pitch is kind of what you’re talking about. Okay, If you’re talking about selling a product because I sell because my stuff, their products, these these books behind me, the product when I’m putting an ad out or if I’m putting out a social media post, people are so busy, you’ve got to grab them fast.

00;17;52;26 – 00;18;11;14
Unknown
There’s got to be something. And, you know, we all know the call to action and we do the attention and aid and all that stuff, but you’ve got to grab people quick because people are going to blaze by it. And when I was in television, we got pitch people all the time. And if they had this big old block of like, bring me on, because I got this, this and this, and if their sort of big sell line is near the end, there’s a good chance we never made it.

00;18;11;14 – 00;18;26;04
Unknown
If you don’t grab us within the first couple of sentences somewhere, I’m not reading the rest of it. So I think when it comes to social media, post or ads, these sort of things, you got as something out of the gate that grabs people attention. It might be a bit of a video, but I’ve done plenty of social media videos.

00;18;26;04 – 00;18;42;06
Unknown
I’ve done them on TikTok, I’ve done them on Instagram, I’ve done my Facebook, and I can track the and let you take a look. Those analytics will crush your soul. You put out that minute and take a look at everybody, build that seven sec, and then your ad goes, okay, I got to grab them that 7 seconds, What can I do?

00;18;42;07 – 00;19;00;10
Unknown
So I’ve got one. I came up with this idea, from what I understand, at least within podium audio, people haven’t done this before. I ended up going because I’ve got the audio book coming out on on the 16th for gain. I know that interviewing my narrators, I spoke to Tim Campbell, who plays Cain, and I ended up speaking to Mary McCann, who plays Imelda.

00;19;00;10 – 00;19;18;29
Unknown
And so I took what they were saying and what the stories and the characters and turn those into a little social media piece. And I noticed that one of the lines that Tim said was that really done with people stuck with people was egos. Like not all French-Canadian werewolves are the same. When you hear that line, you go, What’s he going to say next?

00;19;18;29 – 00;19;39;15
Unknown
What in the world is he talking about? And so that’s what he means. So pay attention to some of those analytics. Now, a good number of my videos, when I’ve got both of them speaking, they start with that line because I know I’ve got them least hooked when they first see that line to carry through. So I think when it comes to anything with e-commerce, any sort of pitches and we all know this, you got to grab them quick, The right side of is different because I grab them and then move on.

00;19;39;15 – 00;19;52;28
Unknown
I still have a bit of a sale with that, especially when people are first starting the book of they pull it off like Kindle Limited or something. I’ve got to grab them early on so I do what a lot of people do. For the most part. I start sort of midway into the action and I sort of go back, but it’s the same sort of thing.

00;19;52;28 – 00;20;08;26
Unknown
You got to grab people quick. There’s so much stuff that is out there trying to compete for their attention. Any time you might have put the most beautiful Instagram video together, if you don’t nab their attention early, it’s just not going to deliver like you want it to. A follow up a quick follow up question, because you have so much experience in TV and radio as well.

00;20;08;26 – 00;20;25;09
Unknown
I know what radio did. You guys do a lot of commercials in ads for or a local radio? Yeah, especially in the beginning, because that becomes part of it. You do your chef thing, get done in your stack with your stock in the sales guys, and then but, you know, if you create a bit of a personality, then you get requested, you get paid a little bit more for that.

00;20;25;09 – 00;20;43;11
Unknown
But yeah, I ended up doing commercials for definitely for for radio for some time. Were there was there any of them that like jumped out at you as like what you’re talking about the hook like grabbing the attention any of them that jumped out at you as like go tos or a lot of ads were using. It’s tough because, you know, I’m a humor writer and a number of people ask people, how do I write humor?

00;20;43;11 – 00;21;00;29
Unknown
And that’s almost impossible to answer. I mean, there are answers for that. But I think it’s just it goes back a little bit sometimes to just grabbing attention. And one that sticks out was in your neck of the woods When I was working for Kasem, an elder at a Springs, Missouri. And all I did was I just took the telephone number and I messed around with it.

00;21;00;29 – 00;21;22;07
Unknown
And it was just like, I guess the request from the person I own the business, they just want wanted people that know the telephone number. And that was kind of like for the 32nd ad, that was the guiding sort of spirit of it. So I had this sort of manic thing I wrote out with a telephone number and I just the whole thing was just about, okay, you starts with six or six, it’s going to be and I did this whole thing of like, let’s get to the end of telephone number using these goofy mnemonics, right?

00;21;22;08 – 00;21;48;28
Unknown
This idea of like make it a bit of a game all the way through. And they went gangbusters with that. In fact, they ran that ad for I left the station after a year. They ran an ad for five years later and it was just something a bit different. It just was, I think, the energy. L Cause I inject a lot of energy into it, but just this idea of rather than saying, Hey, buy my stuffs or come to our restaurant, the whole ad was about memorize the cell phone number for this incredible restaurant and it worked because when you started t the first one you kind of like worries is about to go and

00;21;48;28 – 00;22;03;03
Unknown
people going into it. It’s difficult with radio. There’s sort of a figure that was used for many years. People listen with about 20% of their attention because they’re driving around at work and they are doing whatever and something like that I think grabbed that attention. I sort of made a bit of a promise, right? I made a promise at the start.

00;22;03;03 – 00;22;18;03
Unknown
Seven digit number. Here’s your first digit and kind of want to hear how the other six are going to go. And so you create that from the start, that here’s the arc of what this 30 seconds is going to happen. It pays attention to the end. And I think if there’s some way to build transfer ideas like that into what we’re doing, they do seem to pay off.

00;22;18;03 – 00;22;33;07
Unknown
When you create that expectation of the start as you pay off, I create that expectation at the start to keep people watching. You see you don’t take videos every now and then. You can’t do this style too much. But like, you know, there’ll be like a little banner that says, I’m like, the time I met Kim Kardashian and you see the person going through that line.

00;22;33;07 – 00;22;48;16
Unknown
Well, let me see you meet Kim Kardashian and then you get the yen into poster. Okay. Well, that is fine. And yeah, and you’re going to get all these different views, but I’m not going to trust you again. I’m not going to go back to you. So there are ways to get those views, but you got to make sure you’re meeting that expectation like a suspense, but you got to deliver.

00;22;48;22 – 00;23;08;05
Unknown
Yeah, you got to deliver it. You really do. And it doesn’t have to be a huge delivery. All it was like when I got that telephone number one that comes to mind, all that was was just I just cut to the seven digit and it was fun. That’s all that was. But it worked. You got to make sure you when you make and it’s the same thing with my writing there is something implied or sometimes pretty much on the page is a promise to the reader.

00;23;08;05 – 00;23;30;29
Unknown
Not going to make sure I hit that expectation in some way or you listen. So, Dick, what’s next? Are you working on any books that you can share? I’ve always got ideas. Yeah, that’s the hardware sometimes when you’re writing. So I’ve got I’m writing book for the moment about Through the Way through Book five is coming up shortly after that, when I’ve got two or three competing ideas like knocking on my brain, you know, coming up from my subconscious and subcamp, just given them, just give it as I can.

00;23;30;29 – 00;23;45;10
Unknown
So they’re coming in with the game. Like I said, we’ve got the audiobooks coming out. Fingers crossed there is some interest from the production side, either television or whatever it might be. I don’t want to think too much about it, but the kibosh on it. But who knows? Something might come up that it could be. It could happen.

00;23;45;10 – 00;24;01;24
Unknown
So fingers crossed. If something raises raises up, it makes it happen for sure. On your you’ve got the number one on the bestseller on Amazon. What’s your experience like been selling on Amazon? Do you have a distribution service that sells on Amazon for you? Do you do all the listings? How does that work? I do all the listings for it.

00;24;02;00 – 00;24;23;07
Unknown
I do that through a lot of those through Facebook. I’ve got some Amazon ads and it’s difficult to scale the Amazon ads because at some point they just don’t deliver in the same way before and those can get quite expensive per click a lot. I was just ginning up interest when I ended up doing Cain. I ran a campaign for about 45 days before it happened and I put together short video.

00;24;23;07 – 00;24;37;19
Unknown
Videos are great because they capture attention and when people watch that, you can actually retarget some of those people that watch that video. Yeah, like like Facebook says you could do 3 seconds or 10 seconds. People that watch a video for 3 seconds, people who watch a video for 10 seconds. If I got you watch for 10 seconds.

00;24;37;19 – 00;24;51;12
Unknown
You’re interested in what was going to happen. And so from there I could grab that core of people and then create lookalike audience. And I don’t know. You may know some of what I’m talking about, create this lookalike audience from that and then all those, all that group there, I can say, Listen, the book’s out now, maybe you might be interested.

00;24;51;12 – 00;25;09;07
Unknown
And that really helped launch it in the beginning. And then from there I try to understand who these audiences were, and it’s paying attention to like, you know, I took a look in my case, the also bots on the Amazon page. So people are coming from other writers who do they like. I can target those writers. And so it’s definitely a bit of a process to it.

00;25;09;08 – 00;25;25;22
Unknown
I’m always learning something every single day. Yeah, it took I mean that things shot up so much. So like within two weeks Podium came knocking on my door, said, We want to turn this new audiobook series and they’re one of the biggest out. And then about ten days after that, another big audiobook service came out. So yeah, it really got into a wave.

00;25;25;22 – 00;25;40;24
Unknown
And now a lot of people talk about try and predict the market, which I tried that many years ago and had, like I mentioned, sort of like improper success with. But right now I take a look around and maybe because it’s my own algorithm on Facebook or whatever it might be, there seems to be a fair number of werewolf stories out there.

00;25;40;25 – 00;26;02;03
Unknown
So maybe, who knows, maybe I’m hitting a bit of a wave, so we’ll see how things go. Now, that’s cool. So it sounds like so you’ve got the Amazon and then you’re using Facebook ads to drive traffic over to them and you’ve created some lookalike audiences. It’s also pretty cool that you have multiple books in the series. So like someone obviously if someone bought book one, they’re going to be interested in book two, three and four, so you can retarget them for future books.

00;26;02;03 – 00;26;25;03
Unknown
Yeah, that is the read through. Right is really good on this series. I read another series that I pretty good read through. Right. This one is it’s somewhere up around 45% which is mind blowing. And I think all of that comes down to with all the marketing aside, just writing a story that catches people’s attention and like I said, making sure of that promise at the beginning and one of the implied promises of my stories, or I just I’ll write say it is a good guys will always win.

00;26;25;05 – 00;26;40;02
Unknown
There’s enough negativity out there that I promise the good guys will win in the end of the story. And in fact, I had an amazing email from this woman. It was So this is one of most beautiful things. A few weeks ago, this woman, she was having a hard time because I was kind of sick and things weren’t going really well at work.

00;26;40;02 – 00;26;53;18
Unknown
And so she said to me, with all this going on Gmail, with all this going on, she said, I knew that at night I have a couple of hours in their world. I knew whatever trouble they were getting into, they work their way out of it. And so it was a my little island of joy that I could do.

00;26;53;19 – 00;27;07;27
Unknown
What an amazing thing. What an amazing gift that she felt that she was getting. But people tell me that I created that for somebody that’s really, really powerful. And part of that, like I said, is sort of making that promise that things will work out in the end. It might not work out how you think it might work out.

00;27;07;27 – 00;27;23;02
Unknown
I think because I have no idea what these characters are doing sometimes, but in the end things will work out. So that’s very motivational. So does that. When you hear stories like that, does that keep you, like, motivated to push through when it’s those tough days? Like you mentioned earlier, you’re having a tough time writing those kinds of stories.

00;27;23;02 – 00;27;43;29
Unknown
Are those motivated motivate you to write more books? Yeah, you take your fuel or you can write because you get plenty of detract. And even some of your your frenemy is around to go, I hope it does. Well, I’ve even used those and I don’t get too much into it. But I had a couple of people that I knew within my media circle when I was doing television that would have loved to see me fail.

00;27;43;29 – 00;27;59;07
Unknown
Would you just loved it? I don’t know what engendered that. Maybe it’s because of the personality types or whatever. And there were times where I used this woman’s story as something that makes me feel great and some that can power me. I use that negative stuff too, because I lay there in bed at 4:00 in the morning going, I just can’t get up and do it again.

00;27;59;08 – 00;28;15;21
Unknown
I would think it was like, Boy, they would be so happy for me to say that those those frenemies of mine would be so happy if I didn’t get up and start writing to that. And so I take that negativity and turn around and think I’m going to get it, but it’s proved them wrong. And so that is I think you can use some of those negative people to they, they can be kindling for your fire.

00;28;15;22 – 00;28;32;09
Unknown
So come on there and help them inspire you to prove them wrong. Absolutely. I know somebody else who has who uses that as inspiration as well. Very nice. Again, should we dive into the fire out? Yeah, Let’s jerk dick. Anything else we want to cover before we go into the fire round? Nah, man, I’m all yours. You let me know where we’re going.

00;28;32;12 – 00;28;47;05
Unknown
All right, let’s do it. So the fire out, We take all of our guests, we run into the ringer. It’s called the Fire Round. It’s a series of four questions, and they’re very simple and easy and fast. It’s rapid fire. Okay, Are you ready? Here we go. Yeah. What is your favorite book? Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Nice talking tablet.

00;28;47;07 – 00;29;10;01
Unknown
What are your hobbies? Making my wife happy. That’s a great one. Really important. Yes, very important. What is one thing that you do not miss about working for a man? Putting all my heart and soul effort and health into somebody else’s business? I mean, now I put into my own business, which I love. That’s awesome. Last one. What do you think sets apart successful entrepreneurs from those who give up, fail or never get started?

00;29;10;02 – 00;29;24;06
Unknown
We talked a little bit about this earlier. I think it’s just finding that thing you have to do find that thing you’re most passionate about, find that thing that will, no matter how much you get drained, the tank is always going have something in there. For my part, I feel this way. Don’t sort of seek out. I think this might work.

00;29;24;06 – 00;29;44;03
Unknown
Find that thing you really has to do, really want to do. And you’re always going to have the energy to keep pushing and pushing, and eventually that move will force itself out of the way. Excellent. Excellent advice. Absolutely. Dick, want to thank you for being a guest on the Firing podcast. If people are interested in purchasing any of your books, we’ll be sure to put links to those in the show notes.

00;29;44;03 – 00;30;02;00
Unknown
For anyone interested in following you and any future publications, what would be the best way? Just go to the website. My name Dick. Why Broadcom’s easiest way to buy me awesome in it and we’ll post that in show notes as well. Nick, thank you so much for your time today and we’re looking forward to staying in touch. Thank you both and good luck to everybody.

AI Made Simple: A Beginner’s Guide to Generative Intelligence
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  • Kapur, Rajeev (Author)
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