Emanuel Rose’s Ultimate Guide to Branding and Scaling Sales

Episode 193

Craving fresh insights on digital marketing strategies tailored for small businesses? Then prepare for an intense exchange with Emanuel Rose, CEO of Strategic E-Marketing, a maestro of lead generation, branding, and advertising. Emanuel takes us through his captivating transition to the digital marketing world and reveals how he has been steering his enterprise to success. He offers nuggets of wisdom about marketing strategies for greenhorns, personalizing your brand, and the art of repurposing content for heightened impact.

Are you searching for ways to generate qualified leads and set your brand price point? This episode is a goldmine! With an emphasis on understanding your ideal customer profile, Emanuel expounds on the need to innovate in order to best serve them. He shares insights on product pricing, content creation for lead generation, and the shift from research-based keywords to buyer intent keywords. Plus, we venture into the realm of user-generated content, discussing how to streamline its collection, and the benefits of co-branding and product bundling. Uncover the secret of successful marketing for small businesses in this riveting conversation with Emanuel Rose. Strap in and get ready for a journey into the world of effective marketing strategies.

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00;00;00;01 – 00;00;24;10
Speaker 1
Welcome everyone to the Firing the podcast. On today’s episode, we have the pleasure of interviewing Emmanuel Rose. Emmanuel is a recognized expert in lead generation branding advertising in the day to day operations of a digital agency. For over 25 years, Emmanuel has gone to work each day seeking to pioneer cutting edge lead generation in marketing strategies for the benefit of his clients.

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00;00;24;10 – 00;00;34;18
Speaker 1
Emmanuel is the CEO of Strategic E Marketing, which specializes in machine learning for lead generation. We’re very excited to have Emmanuel on our show today. Welcome.

00;00;34;18 – 00;00;37;21
Speaker 2
Thanks so much. I’m glad to be here and have this conversation with you guys.

00;00;37;22 – 00;00;47;00
Speaker 1
Absolutely. So to start things off, can you share with our listeners a little bit about your background in your path to becoming the CEO of Strategic Marketing?

00;00;47;00 – 00;01;08;20
Speaker 2
You bet. It’s the winding path that a lot of us have had. Where I was working for electronics company when the light lightbulbs were first coming out and I was a brand manager and product manager for a for these lightbulbs and I had had some targets for this company. I exceeded all the targets when it came for them to write me my bonus check.

00;01;08;20 – 00;01;31;13
Speaker 2
They reneged on my contract and so I went in pretty much the next the next week and just said, I’m out of here. I took one more short term job, which I got fired from. I came in as the change agents to help draw some things around and they told me not to do anything for 90 days. I got fired from that role and then I’m like, Well, clearly I’m I manageable and I better just figure this out for myself.

00;01;31;15 – 00;01;43;03
Speaker 2
That was about 13 years ago when social media was just really starting to be on as a necessary activity, and most people didn’t understand it. So that’s what I started my agency as a social media agency.

00;01;43;03 – 00;02;01;29
Speaker 3
Thanks for sharing that story. And it sounds like there are some some left turns and some curveballs mixed in there. But you landed softly and you’ve been doing this for a while now. And so I want to get right into marketing. Let’s say, for all the listeners, if they just have a few hours a day, say, to work on a full time job and then they’ve got, you know, a few hours at night that they’re starting their own brand or their own business.

00;02;01;29 – 00;02;06;04
Speaker 3
What is the one marketing activity that you would recommend to them to execute on.

00;02;06;06 – 00;02;27;17
Speaker 2
That would target that to many video once a week and then Gary Vee that thing into the 65 pieces of content. So everything starts as a video and whether that’s a product review or a success story from a client or some values clarification or a project that they’re in the middle of, and then use that video as the cornerstone for the rest of the content.

00;02;27;17 – 00;02;46;14
Speaker 3
I want to we glossed over that really quick. You met a Gary we hear the reference Gary Vee that that content. And so for the listeners Gary whoever who doesn’t know Gary is content is everywhere and he repurposes it and he does everything. So can you dive into like, what did you mean by that and explain and dig into that a little bit on repurposing things like that?

00;02;46;14 – 00;03;20;25
Speaker 2
So we take that, shoot the video, edit the video to be a standalone two minute for YouTube or for your website and then transcribe video so that it can then become so a short blog post and then go through and tease out key concepts, are key quotes from that blog post and then build out and repurpose parts through repurposed audio or, or some of the other air tools that are out there too, to post that content onto that Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, whatever email campaign that you’re you’re working on.

00;03;20;25 – 00;03;36;19
Speaker 2
So you’re always using the now Go video. It used to be the blog post was the hub of content. Well, now video is the hub of content in terms of shooting that first and then out and then repurposing that video in a variety of ways with using the tools that exist very nice.

00;03;36;20 – 00;03;40;14
Speaker 1
What do you see on the horizon for marketing physical products?

00;03;40;14 – 00;04;07;26
Speaker 2
I see that the need for small, small business people that are don’t have massive budgets to really personalize and interject themselves into the marketing and to be that Kylie Jenner brand advocate as the primary brand advocate and then to to dial in and continue to what was stratification to be clear about who is the ideal client profile that they’re targeting with each piece of the campaign.

00;04;07;28 – 00;04;36;28
Speaker 2
So that really slice it down and speak directly to that person. We’ve got four generations that we’re talking to now from still got Greatest generation to the Z’s and you got way different background listening for each one of those consumers. Let’s say it is dog products, right? You got got fluffy who’s who’s going to the college dorm with the 20 year old college student or you got some guy who, you know, was in the Korean War who’s getting a collar for is Jeremy Shorter.

00;04;37;01 – 00;04;48;27
Speaker 2
Joiner You can’t speak the same way to each of those target markets. So it’s about humanizing from the company side and then about stratifying correctly into the the the prospect side.

00;04;48;28 – 00;05;06;09
Speaker 1
I really like that. I really like that. And that’s something that I think on the front end of picking a physical product is picking something that you are passionate about. We see that a lot in e-commerce where people will just pick a product for the sake of picking it and seems like it might sell well. That’s kind of their basis.

00;05;06;09 – 00;05;11;15
Speaker 1
And so I really like that in picking something that you’re passionate about, it is really helpful.

00;05;11;15 – 00;05;30;26
Speaker 3
So one follow up on the answer to that question. There is kind of like segmenting you’d mentioned kind of like you have you have four generations of people you’re marketing to, especially if you have a common product about this water bottle here, pretty common, right? You could have high school students drinking the water bottle. You could have, you know, pretty much anybody in those four generations could be using a water bottle.

00;05;30;26 – 00;05;39;12
Speaker 3
And so how would you recommend breaking that or segmenting or breaking down? Would you recommend creating content for each of them? Would you recommend what do you what do you think?

00;05;39;12 – 00;06;12;15
Speaker 2
Yeah, that’s always the push pull is how much time and energy you have and budget you have. You know, just to stratify, I like to use a Perino’s principle that, you know, go after the 80% first. You know, if it’s a water bottle and it’s it’s something that’s you know a product that can go by, let’s just say for jam and you have the ability to sell into the end users who are jam build out that campaign for the people who are most likely to spend the money on it, who care about it, and take the the messaging that that’s critical in terms of it’s not plastic.

00;06;12;15 – 00;06;34;10
Speaker 2
We’re saving, you know, landfill space. You’re getting to protect protect yourself from drinking fountains, whatever those things are. Build out that campaign entirely for that one. ICP The ideal client profile and then start to take the next one that’s the next biggest one and try to use as much of that content. It’s channel ready to just modify it slightly but still be on point.

00;06;34;10 – 00;06;52;20
Speaker 3
No, I like it. 8020. That rule applies for so many things and so I like that it like, hey, focus on the 80% of the year, you know your customer avatar and go for that. So out of all the companies that you’ve consulted for, have you observed any common threads And on the companies that are successful could be types of products or cell types of customers.

00;06;52;20 – 00;06;56;29
Speaker 3
They have price point, different industry, different vertical. You notice any trends?

00;06;56;29 – 00;07;16;13
Speaker 2
For me in my career, what I’ve noticed is a that it’s the the product or service that is just coming out, right? It’s the it’s the newest product or the newest iteration of it. And that there’s still margin, there’s big margin in that. So you’re not having to price cut because the value of margin is is as we know, is multiple.

00;07;16;13 – 00;07;34;00
Speaker 2
One is that it allows you to spend more money on marketing and advertising, too. It allows you to continue to do your product development and research. And three, it allows you to take some profit and and get some value. For instance, like when we were doing the LED light bulbs, those were $100 light bulbs, insane, insane amount of money.

00;07;34;00 – 00;07;55;04
Speaker 2
But that was on the very beginning, part of that LED light bulb curve. And so we could continue to refine the engineering or refined processing, get the certifications that we need versus selling CFL or incandescent light bulbs, which were one 100. The cost that you might be able to sell them all day, but you’re you’re never going to be able to make a marginal difference.

00;07;55;04 – 00;08;02;14
Speaker 3
That’s interesting and I’m David the numbers down one of his favorite words is margin. So I was going over to David for a follow up.

00;08;02;15 – 00;08;20;26
Speaker 1
Yeah, my inner CPA is about to come out of the cage. So you talked about margin and I think that that’s something probably a lot of listeners are thinking about as they’re launching a brand. And so when I look at Amazon, which is where can and I make a majority of our sales, there’s a couple different categories. I’d say there’s kind of the sub $20.

00;08;20;26 – 00;08;40;05
Speaker 1
There’s that 20 to 50, 50 to 100, and then just a 100 plus. There are advantages and disadvantages of each one of those price points. But if you were starting a new brand and you had no idea what you were going to launch, what would be some advice you would give as it relates to picking a price point to focus on?

00;08;40;05 – 00;08;59;23
Speaker 2
Well, we have to look first. If I didn’t know what the product was, I had to at least pick a category to start to say, well, where is it? Where is the innovation that’s happening in a category? Let’s say it is dog products and that it’s leashes, right? And just the innovation of having the leash with the flashlight and the refuse bag odor.

00;08;59;23 – 00;09;28;08
Speaker 2
Right. Like that’s an innovation that people who walk their dog care about. And so I would look to take that innovative product and put it at the bottom of the mid category. Right. Rather than the top of the low category. So that you have a well, we say value is based on importance, utility and worth. And so you’re looking to bring up as much value as you can with the innovation of the product to take care of as many of the human concerns at once at the best price possible.

00;09;28;09 – 00;09;30;06
Speaker 2
That’s kind of a mouthful. But does that that.

00;09;30;08 – 00;09;50;17
Speaker 1
Absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. I think that makes a lot of sense. And one thing that I want to follow up on is you had mentioned a little bit earlier that the ICP, the ideal client profile and there are a lot of instances in fact Ken and I have a couple brains that we manage where US is brain donors is different from the customer.

00;09;50;17 – 00;10;15;04
Speaker 1
Avatar example comes to mind. We have some friends of the podcast that bought a brand that specializes in sewing. Neither one of these guys has ever run a sewing machine, and so when they’re they are trying to find innovation in a space they can’t really pull on personal experience. And so where are some good spots to go to find that customer avatar and find that innovation in the space?

00;10;15;04 – 00;10;32;29
Speaker 2
So it’s a great question and it’s really simple, which as you go, if you can, to your very best customers and you say, what’s missing, weak, flawed, incomplete, and what do you wish we were doing for you and and you just a create your innovation protocols and B you’re working in to upsell your best clients immediately.

00;10;32;29 – 00;10;37;07
Speaker 1
I like that. What’s weak, what’s flawed in what’s incomplete and missing?

00;10;37;07 – 00;11;01;13
Speaker 2
Yeah, I like that. Jay Abraham talks about that, too, right? He says we’re on this consistent parade of humans going by us. And it’s like, what are people doing before they’re buying your service and after they’re buying your service a product? And so if we can start as much as possible to integrate small steps into that buying process, then that’s where we able to provide value from innovation so that we’re minimizing the number of transactions a human has to take.

00;11;01;16 – 00;11;21;14
Speaker 3
So I want to kind of pivot into we’ve got some you know, Emmanuel, you’re really good on Legion, right? And so for eCommerce kind of think of lead generation is like qualified candidates coming to our site and making a purchase, right? You have hot lead, warm leads, cold leads. And so for for e-commerce, what are what are your recommendations for getting more leads to an e-commerce website?

00;11;21;14 – 00;11;28;04
Speaker 3
And then also not only get more leads, but maybe more qualified leads, more, you know, high intent shopper Yeah.

00;11;28;07 – 00;12;01;26
Speaker 2
It’s content. Okay. Actually, with Gen Z, they’re going to do all their research online and they’re self-educated. So A it looks you have to look at what your buy intent keywords and latent semantic indexing words are so that you’re building your content around buying versus just researching. That’s, that’s number one. And then two is to build out your content into every form possible because or at least the most likely forms that your ICP or your, your avatar is going to be consuming content and, and getting as massive as they’re stepping them through the process.

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00;12;01;26 – 00;12;19;23
Speaker 2
Important content areas or just general product information? Absolutely. FAA, QS and then comparative into the marketplace and your competition so that you’re you’re key all that up for them and they can go and do that research from from your or from your content rather than having to go oh.

00;12;19;25 – 00;12;39;05
Speaker 3
That’s it’s actually we will we have been doing that in our companies for the last few months. I’ll share with the audience and with you, Emmanuelle, as we’ve been doing content for probably going on three years now on our websites, just generating content, blog, blog style content to get Google, Google organic traffic. And it’s it it works over time, traffic builds up.

00;12;39;05 – 00;12;58;08
Speaker 3
And then recently, probably a year ago, we turned on a tool that captures anonymous email leads. So we started running email marketing to these. And so two of the brands, decent sales, one of them, one of the brands, has a larger email list, but conversion rates are super low. And so we start getting looking into that and it was exactly what you mentioned, buyer intent, keywords.

00;12;58;08 – 00;13;24;04
Speaker 3
And so so the strategy three years ago was, hey, let’s get traffic and now our strategy is prohibiting it. Well, now that we’re wasting money on email marketing and those those leads are not converting and so and for example, for the audience, like let’s stick with the water bottle. So we were writing articles on, let’s say, can a water bottle the two big or do water bottles leak or what are what tomorrow’s made of versus the buyer intent keywords would be where can I buy a the best water bottle?

00;13;24;04 – 00;13;43;13
Speaker 3
What are the top five water bottles to buy buyer intent keywords? And so I just wanted to reiterate how important that is in terms of e-commerce. And if you’re getting leads, if you’re purchasing leads like we are emails or the organic traffic that’s coming in, this is not going to look for something to buy. They’re researching, they’re in research mode.

00;13;43;13 – 00;14;00;11
Speaker 3
We don’t want the HUSAR e-commerce site. We want we want hot leads like someone that’s searching for that. And so that’s that’s excellent. And in terms of the content reference, creating more content. So keyword research is kind of one thing and then content content around that. So what are some examples of like blog posts are one thing but like video and stuff?

00;14;00;11 – 00;14;02;07
Speaker 3
Well, what would you recommend in terms of that?

00;14;02;07 – 00;14;23;16
Speaker 2
The product review is awesome and that that kind of video content. Also any kind of success stories or satisfied client stories that you can reference, you don’t have to say the person’s name and where they live. We’re just like, Hey, this was a situation that happened. This is how we solved it. Or this person took my water bottle at Kilimanjaro and they drank tea at the top of the mountain.

00;14;23;16 – 00;14;34;14
Speaker 2
You know, it’s it’s altitude proof or some stories that add flavor and some dimensionality to it so that people can start to dream their selves into your product for the experience they’re looking for.

00;14;34;15 – 00;14;49;23
Speaker 3
Okay, perfect. So customer generated content or user generated content is kind of like helps helps the philosophy of of a shopper, a potential customer looking at that saying, hey, I could picture myself at the top of, you know, Mount Kilimanjaro drinking tea or whatever. And so I like it.

00;14;49;23 – 00;15;11;18
Speaker 2
People get really hung up on this user generated content, though. And, you know, they’re like, well, I need to get a floor or I need to get their photo. I need to have their story, you know, all these things. And it’s like, I just say, cut to the chase, get the summary, give a view of who that client is and what they’re doing with it and don’t get hung up on on the person, get hung up on the story and the narrative that you’re trying to do to support your product.

00;15;11;18 – 00;15;31;10
Speaker 1
I want to explore this a little bit more because the user generated content, it is gold. At least that’s what we found. However, getting it is something, you know, the customer has already bought from us. We’re very thankful for that. So to make an additional ask everyone to pester them, we never want to bother them, but we want this user generated content.

00;15;31;10 – 00;15;42;13
Speaker 1
And so in terms of making that process seamless, what are some ways that you’ve seen to kind of maximize or minimize that friction and maximize the amount of user generated content that you get?

00;15;42;17 – 00;16;08;17
Speaker 2
I think one of the best examples of UGC right now is Lubold, the scope company in the optics company out of Portland, Oregon. And they you know, they do this promotion every year where people apply to go and do a great unique hunt. And so they’ve got to do like a brand story about a loophole as their application and then, you know, whoever wins, then does the does the trip and then that becomes more and UGC.

00;16;08;17 – 00;16;32;14
Speaker 2
So the idea of a you’ve got to trade something, right? This is a it’s transactional and I think that’s what 99% of companies don’t get is they’re like, Hey, provide your feedback, you know, like why you’re wasting my time. That email is wasting my time. And so it’s got to be, you know, like a free shipping or get get this some kind of an accessory or, you know, part of a competition.

00;16;32;14 – 00;16;38;27
Speaker 2
Right. And then that that way they’re doing this video review is free or they’re filling out a form for you, but they’re getting some bound for it.

00;16;38;27 – 00;16;59;09
Speaker 1
Also I like that contest is a great way. I think that’s something we often pretty common ways are like either, yeah, free shipping or a free product or maybe even cash. But that giveaway of something kind of aspirational, something big like that example that you gave with loopholes I think is a is an excellent idea. And I really like that.

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00;16;59;09 – 00;17;00;16
Speaker 1
I’m glad we spent some time there.

00;17;00;16 – 00;17;18;19
Speaker 3
I think those are great ideas. And like David mentioned, we’re doing we kind of do that now. The accessories piece I wrote a note down here. I’m going to try something else soon on that one. I have an idea there, but we usually do like 25% off or, you know, I guess it’s increasing, increasing and until you get more conversions on that.

00;17;18;19 – 00;17;40;09
Speaker 3
But I do like the large like bundle type thing of like because you can exchange products depending on your product, how much it’s worth. Right. Like a loop old scope is hundreds of dollars or a trip is thousands of dollars. Right? That’s a huge, huge nugget there. And so were smaller brands, maybe bundling a bunch of products together, having like a mega like a mega bundle, offering that something like that, you think that would convert.

00;17;40;09 – 00;18;00;05
Speaker 2
So I come from the philosophy that says I never want to give away or discount my primary product, right? Because it to me is brand denigration. And so I would approach it like maybe I would get something that’s complimentary and give that away if I could if I could co-brand somebody else’s product, you know, if I’ve got a companion product.

00;18;00;05 – 00;18;16;10
Speaker 2
So then you’re kind of sharing, you know, becomes you’re sharing your customer unless you have a chance to then share their customer list and you could give away stuff, cross-pollinate that way. But I don’t like discounts. I think that’s the one, if anybody I think it’s lazy marketing or you just discounting because a they’ve already bought something from you.

00;18;16;11 – 00;18;34;14
Speaker 2
They’re through that buying cycle. Right? And maybe in the future they remember most likely they they they don’t. And so of zero value. So it has to be something that is the next step you know like if it’s free, go back to water bottles you know maybe it’s ice cubes ship like unicorns or, you know, the molds or something.

00;18;34;14 – 00;18;39;03
Speaker 2
Right. You know, that is a is an add on to it versus your product.

00;18;39;04 – 00;18;51;09
Speaker 3
Okay. Yeah, fair enough. One question you had mentioned earlier, like the four generations and so like different marketing gaps fit each. Where does blogging fit and is blogging still work? You still advise on it and.

00;18;51;09 – 00;19;20;06
Speaker 2
Absolutely it’s critical not just for not just for people to self educate. There’s some people are visual, they like to read and they prefer reading over video, but obviously with the way SEO works, we still have to be layering on content on to our website as frequently as possible. Like we’re talking about, you want to build it around buying keywords, you want to understand latent semantic indexing else’s and you want to base it on your video content so that you are streamlining your workflow.

00;19;20;07 – 00;19;36;28
Speaker 1
All right. So in terms of marketing to generations, you had mentioned the example of a Gen Z versus somebody who had been in the Korean War. Let’s go through these. What are some some ways that as we’re targeting each specific generation, what are some things that work and what are some things that don’t work?

00;19;36;28 – 00;19;57;02
Speaker 2
Yeah, that’s great. I mean, these are there is a special beast that I’ve been born in on the Internet. They don’t know a day without computers or smartphones or and so they’ve seen every every lame marketing trick that’s ever been forced upon us. You have to be authentic. You have to really be transparent and show what you believe in and match what they believe in.

00;19;57;02 – 00;20;20;23
Speaker 2
Or you have to have great user generated content to support what you’re claiming is accurate. So that’s the kind of thumbnail phrases millennials all think they’re special. So you’ve got to trigger trigger. This is specialist psychology. They’re also obviously very technically savvy, and they do they love to do their their own research. Also, I think it’s like 60% of B2B buyers now are millennials.

00;20;20;23 – 00;20;45;20
Speaker 2
And so that really changed me to be marketing because that says which is why my age group, we were still people would pick up the phone and talk to a sales rep in the B2B world or the millennials or go and do that research online. So creates that mandate for all businesses. Are your B to B or B to C to really put an effort into and the blogging and fake news and building these kind of funnels and then also to get reviews, right?

00;20;45;20 – 00;21;09;10
Speaker 2
So if you’re an accountant, you still have to have a Google page and get reviews that are positive because you might have a millennial assistant that’s doing the research for somebody to do that work. And then the boomers, they have a little bit different thing. They also think that they’re the most unique and the most correct, and so they’re their triggers is more about taking care of family grandkids at this point and and how they can leave a legacy.

00;21;09;10 – 00;21;14;18
Speaker 2
Those are good triggers. Plus, they get to now be worried about their retirement and how much money is enough. And all those things.

00;21;14;22 – 00;21;16;28
Speaker 1
Who do ask the easiest to market, too.

00;21;16;28 – 00;21;19;27
Speaker 2
I would say there is nothing easy about marketing.

00;21;19;27 – 00;21;21;23
Speaker 3
Nice one answer.

00;21;21;25 – 00;21;40;22
Speaker 2
Oh, really easy. You know, if you have if you have a cutting edge product that’s in short supply, that’s the easiest marketing, right? So that’s why I like the innovation. I like to find whatever is the farthest out on the broader curve. People are less price sensitive and that that’s where the easy comes from, from very innovative, very new.

00;21;40;23 – 00;21;58;19
Speaker 1
You’ve mentioned that a couple times and we’ve talked about engaging with customers. I’ve also taken note that you’ve mentioned a couple a I tools, a millennial who does a lot of research on the Internet. Are there any tools that you would suggest for finding that innovation within a market in addition to talking to customers.

00;21;58;19 – 00;22;27;06
Speaker 2
Any of the, you know, any of the chatter bar, you can use any of those equally. It will help to guide your process. Those would also help you to ask good questions of your clients and your past clients also help you to develop content. A contact calendar. But yeah, what I see with the generative AI right now is that it’s really good if you want to know market standard, your current reality it’s it’s beautiful for that It’s it’s the Encyclopedia Britannica that we all wish we had when we were ten, right?

00;22;27;09 – 00;22;39;29
Speaker 2
Maybe not you guys. I still have an Encyclopedia Britannica. So it’s very good with current reality, with what it is today. So it’ll help you to form the questions that you need to ask the humans for what’s coming forward. I think that’s how I tell you.

00;22;40;01 – 00;22;45;17
Speaker 1
All right. Can you tell us a little bit more about strategic marketing and what type of clients you like to work with?

00;22;45;18 – 00;23;11;29
Speaker 2
So we’re a full service digital agency, a lot of work on on websites, and we do content marketing and LinkedIn marketing in our lead generation for for B2B clients that are usually manufacturer ers, domestic manufacturers. And then on the B2C side, we do a lot of health and fitness. So health clubs, personal training studios, the clients that I like to work with are the ones that just say, Here’s my budget, here’s how many leads I need, Let’s meet them on.

00;23;12;03 – 00;23;22;01
Speaker 2
Very nice use of this. I’ve got my team’s got the walking papers. We can we can go and make build a black box too to get the output that is is leads and then they can manage the sales.

00;23;22;01 – 00;23;24;27
Speaker 3
And David, do we want to cover anything else before we get into the fire around?

00;23;24;29 – 00;23;26;01
Speaker 1
No, let’s get to it.

00;23;26;01 – 00;23;30;22
Speaker 3
All right. So, Emmanuel, we we run all of our guests through what’s called the fire around. Are you ready?

00;23;30;22 – 00;23;34;27
Speaker 2
I’m ready. What is your favorite book? Mary Book is Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse.

00;23;34;29 – 00;23;36;12
Speaker 3
Excellent. What are your hobbies?

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00;23;36;12 – 00;23;40;00
Speaker 2
Well, I fishing backpack skiing, bird hunting.

00;23;40;00 – 00;23;44;27
Speaker 3
Nice outdoorsman. I love it. What is one thing that you do not miss about working for the man.

00;23;44;29 – 00;23;45;28
Speaker 2
His schedule.

00;23;45;28 – 00;23;52;02
Speaker 3
Or her? I last one. What do you think sets apart successful entrepreneurs from those who give up? Fail or never get started?

00;23;52;02 – 00;23;59;15
Speaker 2
Ready, fire, aim and repeat as needed, and being willing to make mistakes and pick yourself up and try another way.

00;23;59;16 – 00;24;07;21
Speaker 1
All right, Emmanuel, for all of our listeners that may be interested in working with you or strategic marketing, what is the best way to get in touch.

00;24;07;21 – 00;24;13;23
Speaker 2
On the web at Emmanuel Rose Ecom or Strategic E Marketing Account Contacts? There you go.

00;24;13;27 – 00;24;21;05
Speaker 1
Awesome. We will post links to both of those in the show notes. Emmanuel, we want to thank you for being a guest on the Firing Demand podcast and we’re looking forward to staying in touch.

00;24;21;11 – 00;24;22;19
Speaker 2
All right. Thanks, guys. Appreciate it.

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